Skip to main content

The Principle of Goodness is an exciting new understanding of ethics that takes account of the welfare of every sentient being. A new, gentler, caring future is in store for humanity and for our non-human friends who share the Earth with us. This site explores using the Principle of Goodness to bring about a new and better future for us all.


Site Key Topics Guide

Elements of Peace Obstacles to Peace
Human Psychology and Peace The Nature of Reality
The Climate Change Scam The Science of Global Warming

Carbon Is Life Book

 

Stop Cruelty to Animals!

<<<<<------------

Most people I know are appalled by the amount and horrific nature of the cruelty to animals of all kinds, going on all around the world.

If you want to take a small step towards stopping this evil, there is now a petition you can sign. Just click on the link.

The Warmists Never Give Up

I was sent the latest missive from Australia's "GetUp" campaigning group today:

Welcome to our "new normal."

Our country is still in the middle of a record-smashing heatwave with temperatures soaring above 40 °C and hundreds of fires blazing out of control around the country. We're being told to "get used to it" but while the nation rallies to fight fires, repair damage and console loved ones we're struggling to have the conversation about our warming planet, let alone get used to it.

The growing mountain of evidence tells a sobering story - a story that needs frequent and urgent repeating if we're to have a chance of preventing the worst of predicted catastrophic climate change.

Do I need to say that I'm less than impressed? First there's the embarrassing fact that even the alarmists admit that Australia's carbon tax, even if it were so extreme as to shut down Australian industry completely, would save at most a few thousandths of a degree by 2050. So what the heck sort of action do they want us to urgently and repeatedly ask for if they have any hope of making a noticeable difference?

Indoctrinated Children in the Classroom

I came across an interesting article from invisibleserfscollar.com on the theory behind modern education practices. It should have been obvious to anyone not in a coma that children are taught the ideological views of their teachers. But the educational theories and the policies that follow, being enforced as part of the curriculum, takes this danger that has always been with us to a new height. In essence, education is no longer developing an individual (ability to think, knowledge, ability to learn, literacy, etc.). No, now it is:

“In the socio-cultural perspective, learning takes place as individuals participate in the practices of a community, using the tools, language, and other cultural artifacts of the community.”

Ah, that word "community"! Every good and positive word in the language has been corrupted, but few so much as this one. "But surely being part of the community is good!" you might say. My answer: only when it can be a free choice. The difference between a good community and a bad one is that good ones are optional - we join them because they nurture us and give us an opportunity to nurture others. Bad ones, like the ones all our children will soon be subjected to, are compulsory. Fall in love with an unapproved man in the middle east? You get murdered. Now, want to be a rugged individualist in the 'enlightened' west? You become stigmatised as a sociopath who won't cooperate and "participate in the practices of a community." Over-dramatic? Don't laugh. That just demonstrates you haven't paid the least attention to what is going on around you.

Regular readers of this blog will know that we are committed to the Principle of Goodness as a critical necessity for getting out of our current morass of bad policies and directions. I'll point out one critical reason why the Principle would hinder this totalitarian socialisation of children: there is a gap, a space, between being good and being evil.

The Ugly Underbelly of Global Warming Hysteria on Display at Oregon State University

As you read the following, please ask yourself why, if this "scientific theory" is so scientific and so well confirmed, all we ever get from its proponents are ratbag acts like the following. Why can't they win by simply convincing us with the weight of evidence? Instead it is pulling down the integrity of the once-respected institutions of society. like universities and governments.

The story is in this email from Gordon Fulks:

Hello Everyone,

In theory at least Oregon State University (OSU) seems to be a bastion of academic freedom, diversity, and tolerance. A wide range of ideas are openly discussed. The most viable rise to the top and the least viable fade away. But it is all a fairy tale, because OSU operates under a politically correct regimen that dictates what is acceptable to say and what is not. Transgressors who dare to be different are eventually weeded out so that the campus maintains its ideological purity.

OSU is not yet as swift or efficient as the Soviet system when Joseph Stalin was trying to quash dissent among biologists who refused to go along with Trofim Lysenko. If warnings to compromise their integrity were not followed, Stalin simply had biologists shot. That quickly thinned the ranks of all biologists and persuaded the remaining ones to comply with Stalin’s wishes. Of course, it also destroyed Soviet biology, because Lysenko was pedaling nonsense. And Russian biology has never recovered.

We learned over the weekend that chemist Nickolas Drapela, PhD has been summarily fired from his position as a “Senior Instructor” in the Department of Chemistry. The department chairman Richard Carter told him that he was fired but would not provide any reason. Subsequent attempts to extract a reason from the OSU administration have been stonewalled. Drapela appears to have been highly competent and well-liked by his students. Some have even taken up the fight to have him reinstated.

The Wisdom of the Great Teachers

In December, the Pure Land Buddhist Centre in Toowoomba (Queensland Australia) hosted a major conference seeking friendship amongst religions. Here are the slides from a talk that I delivered. I hope you like them. The text of the talk follows the slides.

 

 

 

On Seeking The Meaning of Life - Part 6 – Meaning Comes from Within

<< Previous

 

Life has no meaning. Each of us has meaning and we bring it to life. It is a waste to be asking the question when you are the answer.” ― Joseph Campbell

The Meaning of Life comes from within oneself in what you do and what you try to achieve. Take stock of what harm you might inadvertently be doing and what good you are seeking to serve and how you hope to accomplish it. Believing is the necessary first step, but it is the doing that sets us apart.

Some people want to know the meaning first before they feel they can rise to act. But meaning is something we give to our actions. Meaning comes from doing. Regardless of whether we believe there is a higher power, or whether that power has a purpose for us in this life, no matter how weary one's soul feels, no matter how purposeless one may think one is, no one is too small or too insignificant to make a difference. The quality of the world is affected by all its peoples no matter where they live. Just the way even the tiniest flicker of a small flame throws light in a dark room, the simplest of acts add light to someone stuck in a dark corner. Whenever any one strives to make even the smallest effort to help someone be it a person or creature, or to make something better, they add value to the world.    

On Seeking The Meaning of Life - Part 5: What Meaning Do You Want To Give Your Life?

<< Previous Next>>

Life is multi-dimensional and multi-layered – even as you discover meaning in one aspect; you are entering new territory and forging new paths in another and so you’re still at the surface. Life’s journey continues along this spiral path polishing the soul with each round of the merry-go-round.  

Ultimately, life’s meaning is what you choose to give it, wherever and whatever your background.
 
We begin life with a set of paradigms some inherited and implicit in our genes, others taught, learned, gathered, realised, unrealised, conscious and sub-conscious from our families, friends, neighbours, enemies and our environment. Our beliefs about ourselves, how we want to be, how we want our families and loved ones to see us, all play a role in how we develop and define the things we accept, reject, amend, adopt and choose.
 
We choose the things we believe we can never be as well as the things we don't want to be, even the things we sometimes succeed in avoiding or honestly accept as our own weaknesses. In this life we choose the things we want to uphold, our response to the roles we are called on to play and we choose which moulds to break. In our journey for the meaning of life – all of this will be challenged.
 
What meaning will you give your life as you meet these challenges?    
 

On Seeking The Meaning of Life – Part 4: From A Sufi Classic

   

<< Previous   Next>>

Sufi literature has many beautiful mystical works dedicated to describing the types of seekers, the different types of journeys and the quest for oneness with God and the meaning of life.

The Conference of the Bird by Farid Ud-Din Attar is one such classic which has attracted many commentators and derivative works over the years.

There are many insights to be gleaned from this wonderful poetic masterpiece.

b) The ‘Conference Of The Birds’ by Farid ud-din Attar

 
The book is an epic allegory of a seeker’s journey to God. Birds from many species gather to go in search of their ultimate great and mighty King – the Simurgh. The legendary Hoopoe acts as their leader advising them through the long and arduous journey through the seven valleys of search, love, understanding (mystic apprehension), independence (detachment), unity, bewilderment (astonishment), fulfilment in annihilation (total poverty and nothingness).
 

On Seeking the Meaning of Life – Part 3: The Nature of the Answer


<<Previous Next>>

 

 

What kind of answer can you expect?

There are two great examples that best illustrate this point. The first is from the Upanishads which is one of the earliest Hindu philosophical texts. The second is from the twelfth century Sufi classic “The Conference of the Birds” by Farid ud-din Attar.  
 

a) Indra’s Experience - Learning About the Self – Chandogya Upanishad

 
The Upanishads are part of sacred Hindu texts. Historians have differing opinions about its age. Most agree that it predates Buddhism and parts of it are believed to be as old as the Vedas.
 
"The Self which is free from sin, free from old age, free from death, free from grief, free from hunger, free from thirst, whose desires come true and whose thoughts come true—That it is which should be searched out, That it is which one should desire to understand. He who has known this Self from the scriptures and a teacher and understood It obtains all the worlds and all desires.” - Prajapati, Chandogya Upanishad
 
The Upanishads tells the tale of Indra (on behalf of the gods ) and Virochana (among the demons) who on hearing the above go to Prajapati himself to learn about the Self. (Pic left: Indra, the Hindu God of Rain with his consort.)
 
After performing the practice of brahmacharya for thirty two years, they ask Prajapati the meaning of his words.
 
Prajapati tell them that "The person that is seen in the eye—that is the Self." He further said: "This is immortal, fearless. This is Brahman." They asked:"Venerable Sir, he who is perceived in the water and he who is perceived in a mirror—which of these is he?" Prajapati replied: "The same one, indeed, is perceived in all these."
 
He asks them to look at themselves in the water and ask him further if there’s anything they don’t understand. They look in the water and see full clear reflections of themselves including their hair and nails. Prajapati further asks them to adorn themselves in their best and look at their reflections again. Prajapati said,

On Seeking The Meaning of Life – Part 2: Qualities To Develop

<< Previous Next >>

Below is a well known verse from the Bible which is a source of encouragement for those still on the quest:     

Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; he who seeks finds; and to him who knocks, the door will be opened.” 

Matthew 7: 7-8    

The gift of asking the universe and receiving an answer has been with us since ancient times. In the Upanishads and the Vedas from the Hindu traditions there are many verses on searching for the meaning of life. There are many clues about the qualities of what is being sought as well as the attributes that the traveller needs to develop. We look at some of these below:   

Comprehending the Incomprehensible:   

Firstly, in seeking to understand something bigger than oneself – we will only see parts of it and will never be able to understand the whole. The spiritual universe has many more dimensions than any one can ever properly imagine or perceive. The reality is that our senses are tuned to the three dimensional world in which we live.
Syndicate content